Veterinary Resources

Village Vet Animal Clinic Pet Care

View pet care answers for different species below.
pet care

Pet Care in Broken Arrow

At Village Vet Animal Clinic, we have gathered together a number of questions and answers regarding specific species pet care. You can view each animal’s questions by clicking the buttons below.

What should my dog eat?

Once weaned, puppies should eat a hard kibble formulated for puppies. It is important to feed puppy food for the nutrients needed for growth. In addition, you should feed hard kibble instead of canned food. The kibble helps keep the teeth healthy and reduces the need for a medical/dental cleaning. As an adult, dogs need to be fed an adult dog formula, also in kibble form. Purina Pro Plan is the food we recommend. As your dog ages, the food can be adjusted according to your pet’s needs during that life stage. In the event your pet needs a prescription diet for a health concern, we trust Purina Veterinary Diets. Purina has been in business for over 100 years! Their food science is superb, and their influence can be seen throughout the industry. We are very proud of our partnership with Purina Animal Nutrition.

What should my dog not eat?
  • Chocolate or any other substance containing caffeine
  • Grapes, Raisins, Onions, Garlic, Macadamia nuts
  • Xylitol –this artificial sweetener is used in many breath mints and gum. Also, check to make sure that it is not used as a sweetener in your peanut butter if you use peanut butter for dog treats
  • Dogs should NOT eat a grain-free diet unless they have been diagnosed with a grain allergy. Grain-free diets have been linked to Cardiomyopathy in dogs.
  • Dogs should not be fed a raw diet unless it has been formulated and prescribed by a pet nutritionist
  • Bones in any form
Do I have a dog emergency?

If you are concerned about your pet’s behavior, please let us know immediately.

If your dog has experienced any of the following, please head this way and call to let us know you are coming. Your dog is having an emergency!

  • Collapse
  • Body temperature over 104 degrees Fahrenheit
  • First seizure or seizure that continues for more than 1 minute
  • Coughing up blood
  • Known consumption of a toxin
  • Any injury to an eye

If your dog is exhibiting any of the following symptoms, we will want to see them in the office as soon as possible.

  • Lethargy
  • No appetite for more than 24 hours
  • Vomiting and or Diarrhea that is persisting
  • Wounds or lacerations
  • No urine or stool for a day
  • Confusion
  • Increased thirst or urination

Other concerns that need to be addressed but may not be an emergency

  • Hair loss or extremely itchy skin
  • Ear infections or head tilt
  • Leaking urine
I can’t get my cat in the carrier!
Cats do not like change! We recommend making the carrier part of daily life. This means that when you bring home a carrier, set it up in a living space. Take the door off or leave it open. Place a bed and even treats in the carrier. This helps cats acclimate to the carrier. They can go in and out freely and get rewarded when they do enter the carrier. This helps avoid panic when the carrier is pulled from the closet to take a car ride. If you need further assistance or tips, please let us know.
Litterbox Concerns

Cats like it clean! Cats like privacy! There should be a litterbox for every cat in the household, plus one more. Believe it not, the litterbox is where cats pick on one another. Sometimes, a cat will avoid a litterbox if their sibling was aggressive with them near the litterbox. Sometimes cats like to urinate in one and use another for bowel movements. If you provide plenty of litterboxes (spread throughout the house, not all together) and keep them clean, this usually takes care of inappropriate urination. If you have met the clean and private litterbox requirement and are seeing urine or stool outside of the litterbox, schedule an appointment to see us. This could be indicative of a medical concern that needs to be addressed.

What should my cat eat?

Once weaned, kittens should eat a hard kibble formulated for kittens. It is important to feed kitten food for the nutrients needed for growth. In addition, you should feed hard kibble instead of canned food. The kibble helps keep the teeth healthy and reduces the need for a medical, dental cleaning. As an adult, cats need to be fed an adult cat formula, also in kibble form. Purina Pro Plan is the food we recommend. As your cat ages, the food can be adjusted according to your pet’s needs during that life stage. In the event your pet needs a prescription diet for a health concern, we trust Purina Veterinary Diets. Purina has been in business for over 100 years! Their food science is superb, and their influence can be seen throughout the industry. We are very proud of our partnership with Purina Animal Nutrition.

What should my cat not eat?
  • Cats should not eat a grain-free diet unless they have been diagnosed with a food allergy
  • Cats should not eat a raw diet unless the diet has been formulated and prescribed by a pet nutritionist
  • Cats should not eat dog food! Cats and dogs have very different nutritional needs
  • Cats should not eat garlic, onions, grapes, raisins, cow milk, chocolate, alcohol, or raw eggs or bones. Some of these foods can cause organ failure in cats
  • Houseplants or flowers –MANY houseplants and flowers are highly toxic to cats
Do I have a cat emergency?

If you are concerned about your pet’s behavior, please let us know immediately. If your cat has experienced any of the following, please head this way and call to let us know you are coming. Your cat is having an emergency!

  • Vocalizing in the litterbox, no urine output –THIS IS AN EMERGENCY! Especially if you have a male cat. Cats can have a blocked urethra that inhibits the outflow of urine. This is a fatal condition if not treated.
  • Collapse
  • Body temperature over 104 degrees Fahrenheit
  • First seizure or seizure that continues for more than 1 minute
  • Coughing up blood
  • Known consumption of a toxin
  • Any injury to an eye

If your cat is exhibiting any of the following symptoms, we will want to see them in the office as soon as possible.

  • Lethargy
  • No appetite for more than 24 hours
  • Vomiting and or Diarrhea that is persisting
  • Wounds or lacerations
  • Confusion
  • Change in litterbox activity
  • Increased thirst or urination

Other concerns that need to be addressed but may not be an emergency

  • Hair loss or extremely itchy skin
  • Ear infections or head tilt
What vaccines does my bird need?
Birds don’t require vaccines. However, we need to do an exam every year and look at a stool sample to confirm your bird is parasite-free. Your bird will also need to have its wings, nails, and beak trimmed occasionally.
What should I feed my bird?

Birds eat frequently! Your pet bird should be offered a diet designed for its specific species. Parrots are the most common birds we see in the clinic. Parrots should be fed a fortified pellet diet with the addition of fresh fruits and veggies.

  • Avoid cabbage, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, and cauliflower
  • Avoid chocolate
  • Avoid avocado
  • Parrots love fruit! They love it so much that they will refuse to eat other healthy foods. Fruit should be given in moderation.
How do I keep my bird entertained?

Birds are natural foragers. They need to chew, dig around, and think. We love foraging toys that allow the parrots to think their way through the puzzle to get to a tasty treat (think banana chips). Larger parrots require new toys frequently, so keep that in mind. Smaller birds like Cockatiels enjoy small ladders, mirrors, and bells.

What dangers should I be aware of in my home?

Birds are very sensitive! Bird proofing your home is as important as childproofing your home before you bring home a child.

  • Fumes from Teflon cookware can be fatal to birds. The bird does not have to be in the same room as the Teflon.
  • Birds should not be exposed to drafts from windows, doors, or air vents
  • Air pollution from cigarette smoke, pipes, or cigars can be fatal. Smoking in the other room is not enough since smoke travels. If you are a smoker and want to have an avian companion, it is important that you smoke outside. In addition, birds can get sick from the nicotine on your fingers. Make sure you wash your hands thoroughly before handling your bird.
  • Open water in kitchens and bathrooms can be fatal
  • Chemicals used for cleaning can cause respiratory issues
  • Room freshening sprays and melted wax cubes and candles can also cause respiratory distress
  • Ceiling fans are dangerous
  • Electrical cords –birds love the chewy coating of electrical cords
Do I have an emergency?

Birds often hide illness. If you notice any of the following, please schedule an appointment as soon as possible.

  • Sleepy or depressed
  • Not interested in food
  • Fluffed up appearance or hiding under one wing
  • Not perching or perching low in the cage
  • Liquid stools or diarrhea

*If you find your bird on the cage floor, get them to us immediately. Call and let us know you are on the way*

Rabbits, Rodents, and Pocket Pets

Regular grooming is recommended as well as regular nail trims. Some species’ teeth grow throughout their entire life! It is important to monitor the teeth and bring them in for a tooth trim when needed.

What should my rabbit or rodent eat?

We recommend Oxbow food and toys for your pet’s best life. Oxbow has species-specific diets in life stage appropriate formulas.

Fiber is an important part of your pet’s health! Most species get this through foraging on hay.

What should my rabbit or rodent not eat?
  • Chocolate
  • Nuts, seeds, beans
  • Sweets – cookies, cakes, breads
  • Food mixes with added sugars and fats
Do I have an emergency?

If your pet has experienced any of the following, please head this way and call to let us know you are coming. Your pet is having an emergency!

  • Bloated or distended abdomen
  • No stool production or the stools are smaller and firmer than usual
  • Loose stools or diarrhea
  • No interest in food for more than 12 hours
  • Seizure

If your pet is experiencing any of the following, we should see your pet for an exam as soon as possible

  • Sneezing
  • Blood in the urine
  • Overgrown teeth
  • Hair loss
  • Sores on the legs or feet
Why is my rabbit eating its own poop?
Rabbits are supposed to eat their own poop! Rabbits produce two different fecal pellets. The softer feces are nutrient-rich and contain less fiber and higher levels of B vitamins. These fecal pellets are known as Cecotropes. Ingesting Cecotropes is a normal and important part of the digestion process for your pet. As a matter of fact, many bunnies like to eat hay while they are in the litterbox!
What is the most important thing to keep my reptile or amphibian healthy?

Research! Reptiles and amphibians have very specific needs that are specific to the region of the world they originate from. Temperature, humidity, heat, and light are important for all reptiles.

If I keep my reptile in a small tank, will that prevent it from getting too big?
All species have a size that they are genetically programmed to be. Keeping an animal in too small of an enclosure can negatively impact their wellbeing. Illness and aggression are the most serious concerns if not housed appropriately.
What is UVB and does my pet need it?

UVB is an invisible ultraviolet light spectrum. It is essential to all animals, but especially diurnal reptiles. Diurnal reptiles are those that are active during the day. UVB is an ingredient required for reptiles to process Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is required to metabolize Calcium. Without proper UVB, reptiles will use the Calcium from their bones, causing bone and nervous system damage. Without treatment for this condition, reptiles will die.

How long should I leave the UVB bulb/heat bulb on?

Every species has different requirements. As a general rule, UVB should be on during the day for no more than 12 hours, then turned off at night. Your pet will need a heat source at all times if their enclosure needs to stay at a high temperature.

How often should I change my bulbs?

Because the lights used for your reptile emit UVA/UVB, they need to be changed oftentimes before the bulb stops emitting light. Zilla recommends changing the UVB bulbs every 3500 hours. If your pet has the UVB on for 12 hours a day – that would be 291 days or around every 9 months. Every reptile bulb manufacturer will have the recommended hours of use before replacing on their labeling. While it may be frustrating to throw away a bulb that is still emitting light, the UVB is depleted and will not have any benefit for your pet.

Should I feed live prey?
Ultimately, for the safety of your pet, thawed frozen prey is best. Our veterinarians can help you develop a plan to make the switch from live to thawed frozen if you need assistance.